Here’s your new favourite Swimsuit

swimwear

A swimming costume or bikini is probably the most important purchase of the Summer, so it’s one you want to get just right. Whatever your body shape and personal style, there’s a super swimsuit to suit you!

Stand-Out Swimsuit

If you want to turn heads on the beach then back away from basic black and go for eye-catching colour and pattern instead. Spots and stripes never go out of style, and a colourful cut-out swimsuit gives extra fashion points.

swimwear

Perfectly Petite

If you’re looking for a swimsuit to suit a small frame or bust then remember that voluminous frills and ruffles will both add interest. The gypsy-style Leandra Off Shoulder Bikini by Lisa Marie Fernandez is a winner for those who dare to be different. The off-shoulder style is bang on trend too.

swimwear

Killer Curves

The halterneck bikini top is a curvy girl’s best friend for the beach. The Daisy Print Bikini by Dolce and Gabbana is super cute and there are matching retro-style high waist bikini shorts too.

swimwear

Poolside Posing

If you’re not actually planning on getting closer to the water than a poolside sunlounger, La Perla has some incredible swimsuits for posing up a storm in. The sequined ‘Dreamland’ plunge swimsuit is a white hot number that will go great with whatever cocktail you’ve got in your hand – just be careful not to spill!

swimwear

 

Waterpark Ready

Whether you’re keen to do some actual swimming, or want something that will stay put on the waterpark slides, a proper swimming costume definitely has a place in every suitcase. Onia has a good range of sturdy swimwear that will withstand the waves. The Devyn zip-up top is a sporty, supportive alternative, if a one-piece doesn’t appeal.

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Roman In London: where to see it

Roman Wall

As surprising as it may sound (at least to me) the Roman Emperor Claudius invaded Britain in the year 43 AD and founded London who was named Londinium.

However, the Romans settlement didn’t last long (until around 61) when the Iceni tribe, led by Bodica, stormed in and burned it to the ground. A much bigger and stronger City rose in its place, but here and here there are still some remains of that short-lived Roman Empire influence.

The original City was built inside a set of defensive walls and some sections can still be seen today.

Roman London
In the 1300 the City was still confined within the Roman Walls. Map of the British city of London in around 1300. Vectorised version of File:Plan of London in 1300.jpg by William R. Shepherd, a work in the public domain in the United States, also its home country, by virtue of being published in 1923 without copyright renewal.

Roman Wall

Roman Wall
Roman Wall

The Roman Wall was maintained until the 18 century, some of its sections can be seen on the grounds of the Museum of London, in the Barbican Estate and around Tower Hill. It now follows roughly the boundaries of the modern Square Mile. Outdoor displays of the wall stretches can be found along the thoroughfare of London Wall, towards the Museum of London.

Roman Amphitheatre

Remains of London’s amphitheatre were recently discovered in the north of the city (1888 in Guildhall Yard), and you can visit them at the Guildhall Art Gallery. The  80m-wide dark circle of  dark stone in the courtyard outside shows where the Roman amphitheatre in London once stood.

It was built in AD70 as a simple wooden structure, it’s not clear yet what was happening inside the amphitheatre at that time, whatever animal fighting or gladiators being executed, what is sure though, is that it was a place for mass entertainment as it had a capacity to host up to 6.000 people.

Roman Amphitheatre © photo by PastLondon on Flickr

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Obsession at The Barbican: Review

Jude Law and Halina Reijn are the protagonists in Ivo van Hove’s “Obsession”, stage version of Visconti’s 1942 film at the Barbican which I went to see last weekend and this is my review of the play.

The story is an adaptation of the 1930s  crime novel  ‘The Postman always rings twice” by James Mc Cain about a man and a married woman having an affair and the plot to murder her husband.

The scenography set is minimalistic with a modern and stylish twist, but, although well-thought and very dynamic, I’ve really struggled to imagine those described Italian ambients and scenarios.

As soon as you step into the theatre hall you’re already submerged into the atmosphere as the actors are already performing their set on stage.

You can start “breathing” and witnessing the boredom of Hannah’s life in her marriage with Joseph as she lays almost stranded in the kitchen, her mind elsewhere, her anguish in the solitude while her present/absent husband carries on his work duties. The lack of communication and respect between them is already palpable.

After a few minutes, Jude Law sets his foot onto the stage and the atmosphere gets suddenly intense as the immediate erotic attraction with Hannah sets the voyeuristic expectations high. Although the focus of the acts is not onto their passion, but more on the internal conflicts of the character of Gino (Jude Law) who struggles with a debate between his wild and free side of personality versus the desire and love for a woman. However, the possibility of a stable and  (perhaps in his opinion) boring life, makes him struggle and not able to cope.  The play depicts his shifts from pure passion to boredom with the rapidity of the blink of an eye.

Jude Law interpretation is stellar in interpreting the difficult character of the moody Gino and so is the interpretation of Halina Reijn, however, especially in some fundamental parts of the story, the abstract scenography makes it harder for a viewer to fully immerse in the play.

At Barbican, London, until 20 May. Box office: 020-7638 8891.

 

 

 

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A day out in Greenwich

Greenwich is one of London’s most loved boroughs and home of some of London’s most iconic museums and landmarks like the Prime Meridian Line, the Cutty Sark or the Royal Observatory Museum.

 

Greenwich. Photo By Roman In London

 Morning:

The Cutty Sark is the first thing you’ll notice when out of the DLR, the historic merchant ship suffered from a fire in 2007 but has been restored after that.

But, let’s start the day from the Royal Observatory.The Royal Observatory is home to the Greenwich Mean Time and Prime Meridian line,  you’ll get the chance to learn about the discoveries of the 18th century while also having one on each side of the line and be in both eastern and western hemispheres at once.

Greenwich. Photo By Roman In London

Next stop is the National Maritime Museum. Here you can learn about the tales of explorers and brave sailors through an interactive collection of artefacts and displays.

greenwich
The Gypsy Moth, Greenwich. Photo By Roman In London

 

Photo By Roman In London

Lunch:

Greenwich is a great place to stop for food for its famous food market, there’s a fantastic range of street food from various part of the World, you’ll sample mini pancakes, macaroons and churros, marmalades and jam or authentic dim sum and dumplings and much more.

Photo By Roman In London

Afternoon:

After lunch, you can visit the Fan Museum, the world’s only museum dedicated to fans. Greenwich’s Fan Museum contains over 4,000 antique and unique fans dating as far back as the 11th century. The museum will take you through exhibitions about their social importance and cultural significance over time.

View from the Royal Observatory.

Evening:

You can end up your day in Greenwich in one of the most iconic pubs in London: The Gipsy Moth overlooking the Cutty Sark there is one of the most hard-to-beat views of any riverside pub.

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The Fog at The Tate | Fujiko Nakaya

London Fog, by Fujiko Nakaya, 2017, on the South Terrace of Tate Modern’s Switch. Photo By Roman In London

 

You may have noticed a mist of fog descending on the Tate Modern’s South Terrace. If you’ve been wondering what that was, it’s part of their new live exhibition, Ten Days, Six Nights.

The new installation is from 83-year-old Japanese fog-sculptor Fujiko Nakaya, which launched officially on the 24th od March. Nakaya, who first came to prominence through her collaboration with Experiments in Art and Technology (EAT) in 1970 and has been working with water vapor for over 40 years trying to develop a system to disperse water vapor at high pressure to create a cloud of mist.

A few of her installations have adorned bridges in Bristol, the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao and Philip Johnson’s Glass House.

This particular amorphous work acts as a barometer, reading shifts in atmospheric conditions – sometimes producing a faint mist, other times rocketing out great puffs of smoke. Of the work, Nakaya says:

‘Nature controls herself. I try and let nature speak.’

This was the time in the 60s when everyone was out on the streets. So, I didn’t want to paint clouds, I wanted it to interact with the environment,” she has said.

Walking inside fog, people are suddenly confronted with white darkness, but soon they find themselves trying to use all the senses other than the visual to orient themselves.

People love the feel of fog on their skin, immersed, wet and cold, but gentle and soothing. It’s a primary experience.

 

Info: Permanent Installation, South Terrace: Fujiko Nakaya, London Fog with Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani

Address

Tate Modern
Bankside
London
SE1 9TG

 

 

 

 

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Staycation this Easter? Here’s what London has to offer

As spring gets underway, this will guide you through

the best of the calendar this April

 

1. Art & Exhibitions

 

Watch Twelfth Night

In casting Tamsin Greig as “Malvolia”, director Simon Godwin refocuses Twelfth Night. Tamsin Greig stars in the National Theatre’s adaptation of this beloved Shakespearean classic where romance and gender collide with comedic flair.

Tickets from £15 at Nationaltheatre.com.

 

Master the art of the selfie

We all knew it: It was only a matter of time until someone decided that a selfie can be classified as a work of art. The Saatchi Gallery is –  as always – one step ahead of the curve with its pioneering exhibition: From Selfie to Self-Expression.

Free admission at Saatchigallery.com.

 

2. Easter Choccolate Treats

Try a chocolate scotch egg

Decadent cream egg-style fondant. covered in a brownie ganache and then rolled in crushed mini eggs. Is your mouth watering yet?

 

Photo Credits Channel4

3.Things to Do

“The Passion of Christ”

Participate in a mass religious-inspired performance of Jesus’ final days. As every year a re-enactment of Jesus’ final days, via a free performance from more than 100 actors, volunteers and performers. The 90-minute performances  are also projected onto big screens,

Friday 14th April; 12pm and 3.15pm, Trafalgar Square

The wildest egg hunt

An Easter egg hunt alongside entertainment and activities. This Easter Sunday you’ll be witnessing the  ‘the wildest egg hunt in South London’ – with lots of fun and “wild” activities such as magicians, craft activities, performers and face painters. This event is for all ages all day before Midnight Riot Records take over at nightfall for an epic adults-only after-party.

Credits Travioor

Sunday 16th April  at Pop Brixton

Easter Light Show & 500th anniversary at Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace is celebrating its 500th anniversary this year over the Bank Holiday Weekend. This will involve a  live cooking event in the Tudor Style,  and the launch of TimePlays – a series of micro-plays telling the stories of the palace’s rich history.

There is also a spectacular Easter Light Show every evening. hcp500.hrp.org.uk

 

Southbank Easter Fun Fair

Workshops, family activities, dance schools and parties at Southbank Centre, easter Food Market, even a bunny. This is what you wouldn’t really want to miss out. FOMO is bad.

https://southbanklondon.com/our-guide-to-easter-on-south-bank

When 1-17 Apr

 

Tall Ships Regatta

More than 30 vessels sailing along the Greenwich and Woolwich riverfronts for you to enjoy river-themed activities and fireworks.

13-16 Apr

 

Photo credits VisitsLondon

 

Easter Opening Hours and Transport in London

Good Friday and Easter Monday are both public holidays.

Most attractions are open over the Easter bank holiday, but check with individual venues in advance; particularly to find what is open on Easter Sunday in London. Shops are closed on Easter Sunday, Public transport services, including the London Underground, may be reduced between Good Friday and Easter Monday, so plan your journey in advance.

 

 

 

 

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Cerith Wyn Evans at The Tate Britain

Cerith Wyn Evans art Installation. Photo By Roman In London

Cerith Wyn Evans art Installation. Photo By Roman In London.

A neon explosion of glow has recently been installed at the Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries. Welsh Artist Cerith Wyn Evans’s new masterpiece Forms in Space…by Light (in Time) has won this year Tate Britain Commission.

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art.

It seems all random when you walk in but it’s not.  As you come closer under the suspended lighting hanging from the ceiling, you can actually notice that there are patterns: cones, triangles, ovals.

There’s a rhythm to this mass of electricity. Apparently, hidden in the design are references to a host sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23 (Noh is a traditional form of dance from Japan).  Marcel Duchamp, the father of conceptual art is also an inspiration for the artist.

You can see this installation until the 20th of August

Info:

 Duveen Commission, March 2017.

Address: Millbank
London
SW1P 4RG
Opening hours: Daily 10am-6pm (last admission for special exhibitions 5.15pm)
Transport: Tube: Pimlico/Vauxhall
Price: free
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A day at the Museum of Modern Art in Rome | GNAM

GNAM is the acronym for Galleria Nazionale D’Arte Moderna (National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art of Rome) and is located in Via delle Belle Arti in Rome.

The Cesare Bazzani-designed neo-classical building is known as Palazzo delle Belle Arti (Palace of Fine Arts) and it was completed in 1915.

 

 

Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art “GNAM” Time is out of Joint Exhibitions. Photo by Roman in London

 

Amongst all the paintings and sculptures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, you can also find artists of the likes of Antonio Canova, Giorgio de Chirico, Amedeo Modigliani, Giacomo Manzù. The museum also holds some works by foreign artists, among them Braque, Calder, Cézanne, Degas, Duchamp, Giacometti, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Monet, Jackson Pollock, Rodin, and Van Gogh.

 

Cafe’ at the Museum. Photo by Roman In London

 

Suit
Details. Photo By Roman In London

 

Business suit
Details. Photo by Roman in London

 

Sneakers
Details. Shoes

 

 

Museum of modern and contemporary art in Rome
Details. Photo by Roman In London

 

I was very impressed by the exterior of the building and the dialogue between modern and classic also highlighted by the current exhibition theme Time Is Out Of Joint – that is displaying classical Roman statues with modern and contemporary pieces of art.

 

Photo by Andrea Castellani

This a  selection of some of the things I’ve seen that grabbed my attention.

Hall of the Museum. Photo by Roman in London

 

 

Sculpture
Photo by Roman In London

 

Joan Miro’. Photo by Roman in London

 

Photo by Roman in London

 

Self-portrait “suspended” Sam Taylor Wood #getaway #romaninrome #art #gnam #galleriaartemoderna #roma

Un post condiviso da Giulia (@giulia_a_roman_in_london) in data:

hall of the museum
Photo by Roman In London

 

Door
Details. Photo by Roman In London

Hope you have enjoyed it, in case you’d like to visit it, here are the info.

Information:

Address: Viale delle Belle Arti, 131, 00197 Roma, Italy
Hours: Tuesday to Sunday 8:30 am to 7:30 pm
Last admission 45 minutes before closing

Closures Every Monday, 1st of January, 1st of May, 25th of December

Phone: +39 06 322981
Founded: 1883

 

 

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A Weekend in Rome

When it comes to travelling to my hometown every excuse is a good excuse, really 🙂

A Weekend, a whole week or even a fortnight, regardless of the amount of time I spend there, every time never really seems to be enough. On the other hand, I can’t really complain, Italy is only a couple of hours flight away from London and offers a plethora of opportunities and places to go depending on the season.

My favourite, though, is…

Spending a Weekend in Rome

Sunset nearby Largo di Torre Argentina. Photo by Roman in London

Here remnants of the Empire meet Renaissance masterpieces, cobbled piazzas and wonderful churches, it’s all thrown in with an increasingly cool contemporary art, food and drinks scene.

But since you’d need an actual eternity to see everything in the Eternal City, I’ve shared with you some pictures I’ve taken while walking around Central. It took me a couple of hours (with something like 300 stops to take pictures) to walk from Piazza del Popolo to Largo Argentina.

During this short walk, you can see the major landmarks: Piazza del Popolo, via Del Corso, Piazza Di Spagna and the famous ‘steps’, Pantheon, Galleria Colonna, Fontana di Trevi, Piazza del Parlamento, Altare della Patria and Largo Argentina.

History is around every corner of Rome. From the Pantheon and the piazzas to Vatican City’s Sistine Chapel, the ‘Eternal City’ is one of the world’s most historically significant destinations.

In fact, in Rome, classical ruins and early Christian places of worship stand just next to Renaissance palazzos and Baroque fountains, but also to great – and contemporary – neighbourhood trattorias, quirky shops and a crowded aperitivo scene. Happy hour for us is a way to meet with friends, have a glass of wine (or two) and eat some starters from the buffet.

The city’s mild Mediterranean climate is another persuasive reason to visit (aside from December – February that can get a bit chilly there too).

Piazza del Popolo. Photo by Roman in London

 

 

A private Courtyard in central Rome. Photo by Roman In London

 

 

Via del Corso. Photo by Roman in London

 

 

Corner of Via di Gesu’ e Maria. Photo by Roman in London

 

 


 

 

Details of a post box. Photo by Roman In London

 

Bakery Sign. Photo by Roman In London

 

Private Courtyard. Photo by Roman in London

 

Old Metropolitan Cinema. Photo by Roman in London

 

 

Piazza Navona. Photo By Roman In London

 

“M’hai provocato e mo me te magno!” #hometime #romanholidays #romaninrome #getaway

Un post condiviso da Giulia (@giulia_a_roman_in_london) in data:

Some information:

Visitor passes

The Roma Pass (romapass.it) discount card, currently priced at €36 (three day) or €28 (two day) and available online or from tourist information offices, gives free entry to two museums of your choice and reductions for many others, plus unlimited use of citywide public transport.

International dialling codes

0039 06 for Rome numbers from abroad
06 from inside Italy
00 to get an international line

 

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12 books I’ve read in 2016

Books rview

January:

“The Joke”

Milan Kundera is my favourite author and he has never disappointed me so far. His way of writing is brilliant, The Joke is about what you don’t expect to happen, but that shapes your life instead and your way of thinking even. This book also talks about political analysis, historical references and discussions of music and post-modern narrators and finally, love. Needless to say, truly recommended.

February:

“The Girls”

Written by Emma Clint

Even though I’ve heard many good things about this book, I must admit that I fail to understand the reason why. It brings me back to my teenage years and those books you read while on holiday to lighten the weight of more “heavyweight” books that you have to study instead.

It’s based in the 60’s, the plot is about the life of troubled teenagers living in Northern California.

I totally struggled to get to through the end of it.

March:

“Modern Romance”

Written by Aziz Ansari

Borrowed by a colleague of mine, I really couldn’t wait to read the stories of Modern Romance, a book about an era of technology-based communication and now even flirtation. Gone are the days of the bold first moves at the local cafe’ when an exchange of smiles could have meant the begin of something. Things are changing fast, but not necessarily in a bad way, this according to the Author at least.

Do you agree?

April:

“If on a Winter’s night a traveller”

 

Written by Italo Calvino

A very different writing style, experimental. A postmodern classic, different stories are written in a humorous and deeply engaging manner. Mystery, love, spies you have it all in this book. Truly recommended.

May:

“1Q84”

 Written by Haruki Murakami

Less keen on the magical fiction genre, however still intrigued by the story. A mix between a love story, a novel, a self-discovery journey of both the protagonists (Tengo and Aomame), but also a “rival” to the dystopian reality of 1984 by George Orwell. Well written, though a bit repetitive, probably one of the reason why it’s 900+ pages.

June:

“As the crow flies”

Written by Véronique Tadjo, Wangui wa Goro

“Indeed I too would have loved to write one of those serene stories with a beginning and an end. As you know only too well, it is never like that, though. Lives mingle, people tame one another and part. Destinies are lost.”

Tadjo flies over different lives and experiences – as a crow does – in search of truth.

 

July:

“Per dieci minuti”

 Written by Chiara Gamberale

This Book is written by one of my favourite contemporary Italian novelists, suddenly Chiara’s life no longer exists, at least how she used to define it.  Because sometimes life can challenge you and can happen that your partner leaves you and that you have to leave the house in which you grew up. That your work may be entrusted to another. Her therapist then suggests her that for a whole month, every day, for at least ten minutes, she has to do a new thing that she has never done before. This will lead to surprising choices. Chiara Gamberale it’s telling us that changes are scary, but are necessary to get back to “life”.

Even though the reviews of this book aren’t generally great, I’ve truly enjoyed. A quick read (on a 3-hour flight from Rome to London) but overall very pleasant.

August:

“1984”

Written by George Orwell

One of my favourite books so far… I love novels, but when novels have some science fiction in them then it’s the perfect mix for me. This is one of the classic books and I don’t have any idea of why it took me so long to decide to finally read it!

The year is 1984 and George Orwell’s prophetic and dystopian vision (or negative utopia) of how the world will be by that time has hooked me from the very first line.

“WAR IS PEACE.

FREEDOM IS SLAVERY.

IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.”

September:

“Thinking Fast and Slow”

Written by Daniel Kahneman

Aim to engage and challenge the reader on the way we think. Intuitions are not always to be trusted, while slow thinking might be the better choice. This is part of our nature that makes us sometimes biased or making us tend to jump to conclusions too fast.

October:

“The 10X Rule”

 

 

A dear friend gave it to me as a gift and told me” You MUST read this” it totally changed the way I approach life goals. I then read it and thanked it for the suggestion, I won’t take every single word of the author of the book as the “Holy Grail of life” but definitely is a broader perspective that we should take into consideration. It basically explains that, in order to achieve our goals, we should put 10 times the effort and establish a 10times higher outcome. In order to keep us all always motivated and engaged.

November:

“The Rosie Project”

 

 By Graeme Simsion. Published in 2013

Don Tillman is an Associate Professor of genetics at the University of Melbourne, he’s charming but he’s never been on a second date. He’s also socially challenged and has Asperger’s syndrome but he doesn’t know that.  Before completely losing hope of finding his soul mate,  he decides to embark upon a singular project called “The Wife Project”.The scientifically minded scientist makes a list of all the characteristics his future spouse will need to possess, however, on the journey to the perfect match he will randomly meet a woman who definitely won’t check any “item” on the list.

This book is fun, well written and engaging. I like the fact that this book, event tough highlights serious issues that people with the disease face every day in their life,  also shows that if you move beyond the irregularities of a person, we all have something to offer and that we all have value and strengths and all deserve respect and to be treated with dignity.

December:

“Brave New World”

 

Written by Aldous Huxley

“Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn’t nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.” 

Aldous Huxley narrates about a future where the World is controlled by people that want to build the ideal society.

A masterpiece.

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