The Fog at The Tate | Fujiko Nakaya

London Fog, by Fujiko Nakaya, 2017, on the South Terrace of Tate Modern’s Switch. Photo By Roman In London

 

You may have noticed a mist of fog descending on the Tate Modern’s South Terrace. If you’ve been wondering what that was, it’s part of their new live exhibition, Ten Days, Six Nights.

The new installation is from 83-year-old Japanese fog-sculptor Fujiko Nakaya, which launched officially on the 24th od March. Nakaya, who first came to prominence through her collaboration with Experiments in Art and Technology (EAT) in 1970 and has been working with water vapor for over 40 years trying to develop a system to disperse water vapor at high pressure to create a cloud of mist.

A few of her installations have adorned bridges in Bristol, the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao and Philip Johnson’s Glass House.

This particular amorphous work acts as a barometer, reading shifts in atmospheric conditions – sometimes producing a faint mist, other times rocketing out great puffs of smoke. Of the work, Nakaya says:

‘Nature controls herself. I try and let nature speak.’

This was the time in the 60s when everyone was out on the streets. So, I didn’t want to paint clouds, I wanted it to interact with the environment,” she has said.

Walking inside fog, people are suddenly confronted with white darkness, but soon they find themselves trying to use all the senses other than the visual to orient themselves.

People love the feel of fog on their skin, immersed, wet and cold, but gentle and soothing. It’s a primary experience.

 

Info: Permanent Installation, South Terrace: Fujiko Nakaya, London Fog with Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani

Address

Tate Modern
Bankside
London
SE1 9TG

 

 

 

 

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David Hockney Exhibition at the Tate Britain

Firstly, thanks to the David Hockney Exhibition, I had the chance to visit for the first time the Tate Britain (which is an astonishing museum by the way) as – oddly enough –  I never did since moving to London.

Secondly, I was very curious to see this exhibition and, although when it comes to art I’m quite easily pleased, this exhibition has impressed me in a quite unique way: the eclectic-ness of his art, the colours, the subtle humour revealed in some of his paintings (made me giggle a couple of times at the very least) along with the variety of the subjects of his representations: from daily life to unusual perspectives, all caught with a unique cleverness.

This exhibition is currently displaying 60 years of works of the Yorkshire-born English Artist, and it spans from the early stage while being a student in Los Angeles to the newest works made since his return to California.

 

Tate Britain
Tate Britain. Photo by Roman In London


David Hockney was born in 1937 and is one of the most popular artist of our time.

David Hockney. Credits HuffingtonPost

 

He has frequently challenged and questioned the conventions with his works, as with the protocols of perspective or simply by playing satirically with abstract art.

 

David Hockney Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures) 1972 Private Collection © David Hockney Photo Credit: Art Gallery of New South Wales / Jenni Carter

During the 60’s Hockney moved to California and set out to paint that Country. The openness of the space or the geometry of the buildings and designs of the houses.

He is truly fascinated by the colours and at the same time questions of how could a painter capture the constant moving and transparent qualities of glass or water were absorbing him.

“WINTER TIMBER” 2009 OIL ON 15 CANVAS Credits Pinterest

 

 

David Hockney Garden with Blue Terrace 2015, Private Collection © David Hockney Photo Credit: Tate

Naturalistic representations were part of the late 60′ works. A series of still lifes and landscapes enabled him to master the qualities of acrylic paints.

 

Garrowby Hill, 1998 oil on canvas, Credits Pinterest

As mentioned earlier I have loved this exhibition and truly recommend it.

Tate Britain. Photo By Roman In London

 

Tate Britain. Photo By Roman In London

 

Tate Britain. Roman In London

 

Sculpture. Photo By Roman In London

 

Details of the interior of the building. Photo By Roman In London

 

View of the Big Ben. Photo By Roman In London

Info

Dates: 9 February – 29 May 2017

Final weekend:
Friday 26, Saturday 27, and Sunday 28 May open until midnight
Monday 29 May open until 21.00

PRICING

£19.50

A Roman In London

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Yayoy Kusama at Victoria Miro

yayoy Kusama

Until July 30th at Victoria Miro 

Last Saturday, on a very sunny London day, I was curious to see the exhibition everyone was talking about and ended up joining – what I later defined as – one of the longest queue of my life. Talking with other people apparently, their experience was quite the same.

Why is that?  Yayoy Kusama,  a Japanese  87-year-old, is one of the world’s most popular artist  at the moment. She has worked on multiple projects throughout her career including painting, scupltures, environmental installations. She has even teamed up with fashion brands on the likes of Louis Vuitton, Uniqlo and so on.

 

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Yayoi Kusama. Photo: © Yayoi Kusama; Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo /Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York; KUSAMA Enterprise.

 

Although her work includes a variety of different projects and themes, the pumpkins, the dots and the mirrors can be described as her successful and signature style.

Kusama, as some of the most talented artists, has experienced periods of acute mental instability and she declares that: I use my complexes and fears as subjects… I am pursuing art in order to correct the disability which began in my childhood”.

 

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Photo by Roman in London

 

I must say that the exhibition in Wharf Road (Islington) didn’t disappoint me:it included some of her installation and sculptures, while the paintings are currently available at the Mayfair Branch of the gallery.

The first installation I went in was one of three mirror rooms, called ‘the Eternal Love I have for the Pumpkins’ which provides you with a  fully submersive experience of one kind: you’ll find yourself immersed with coloured dotted black and yellow pumpkins of all shapes and size. Apparently, she connects them with her good childhood memories. “Pumpkins have been a great comfort to me since my childhood: they speak to me of the joy of living,”

 

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Yayoi Kusama Chandelier of Grief, Photo by Roman in London

 

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Narcissus Garden. Photo by Roman in London

The Chandelier of  grief is an experience of being surrounded by bouncing lights, while in the garden you can find  Where the Lights in My Heart Go (2016),  a mirrored cube which reflects the pond in which  the silver spheres of Kusama’s Narcissus Garden (1966) are floating around.

 

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Narcissus Garden. Photo by Roman in London

Yayoi Kusama: Sculptures, Paintings and Mirror Rooms is at Victoria Miro, 16 Wharf Road, London, N1 7W; My Eternal Soul Paintings is at Victoria Miro, 14 St George St London, W1S 1FE; both until 30th July

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